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as2con is the R&D partner of PMS Class

PMS Class is pleased to announce a new cooperation with s2con-alveus ltd. based on R&D and engineering services in the domain of maritime technologies.
A two year agreement on cooperation was signed on May 30th 2014, subject to extension upon the decision of both parties.

PMS Class Template For Onboard Complaints Handling Logbook

It is very important to each maritime shipping company develops a good system for handling complaints onboard to avoid any unpleasant deviation from the proper living & working conditions onboard.. in compliance to this fact PMS Class developed good guidance for maintaining Onboard Complaints Handling Logbook, Please get your template from here Complaints Register Book

Coming Soon
PMS Class Checklists For MLC 2006 Implementation.

MLC – Maritime Labour Convention, 2006

Maritime Labour Convention, 2006 (Entry into force: 20 Aug 2013)Adoption: Geneva, 94th ILC session (23 Feb 2006) – Status: Up-to-date instrument (Technical Convention).

Preamble

The General Conference of the International Labour Organization,
Having been convened at Geneva by the Governing Body of the International Labour Office, and having met in its Ninety-fourth Session on 7 February 2006, and
Desiring to create a single, coherent instrument embodying as far as possible all up-to-date standards of existing international maritime labour Conventions and Recommendations, as well as the fundamental principles to be found in other international labour Conventions, in particular:

– the Forced Labour Convention, 1930 (No. 29);
– the Freedom of Association and Protection of the Right to Organise Convention, 1948 (No. 87);
– the Right to Organise and Collective Bargaining Convention, 1949 (No. 98);
– the Equal Remuneration Convention, 1951 (No. 100);
– the Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, 1957 (No. 105);
– the Discrimination (Employment and Occupation) Convention, 1958 (No. 111);
– the Minimum Age Convention, 1973 (No. 138);
– the Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, 1999 (No. 182); and

Mindful of the core mandate of the Organization, which is to promote decent conditions of work, and
Recalling the ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work, 1998, and
Mindful also that seafarers are covered by the provisions of other ILO instruments and have other rights which are established as fundamental rights and freedoms applicable to all persons, and
Considering that, given the global nature of the shipping industry, seafarers need special protection, and
Mindful also of the international standards on ship safety, human security and quality ship management in the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended, the Convention on the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, 1972, as amended, and the seafarer training and competency requirements in the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978, as amended, and
Recalling that the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, 1982, sets out a general legal framework within which all activities in the oceans and seas must be carried out and is of strategic importance as the basis for national, regional and global action and cooperation in the marine sector, and that its integrity needs to be maintained, and
Recalling that Article 94 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, 1982, establishes the duties and obligations of a flag State with regard to, inter alia, labour conditions, crewing and social matters on ships that fly its flag, and
Recalling paragraph 8 of article 19 of the Constitution of the International Labour Organisation which provides that in no case shall the adoption of any Convention or Recommendation by the Conference or the ratification of any Convention by any Member be deemed to affect any law, award, custom or agreement which ensures more favourable conditions to the workers concerned than those provided for in the Convention or Recommendation, and
Determined that this new instrument should be designed to secure the widest possible acceptability among governments, shipowners and seafarers committed to the principles of decent work, that it should be readily updateable and that it should lend itself to effective implementation and enforcement, and
Having decided upon the adoption of certain proposals for the realization of such an instrument, which is the only item on the agenda of the session, and
Having determined that these proposals shall take the form of an international Convention; adopts this twenty-third day of February of the year two thousand and six the following Convention, which may be cited as the Maritime Labour Convention, 2006.

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To Get Familiar With The Its Measures Or If You Want To Enhance Your Ability In Maintaining The Proper Implementation Throughout Operational Life Of  Your Good Fleet , Please Don’t Hesitate And Request Our Training Service.

ISPS Code

The International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code) is a comprehensive set of measures to enhance the security of ships and port facilities, developed in response to the perceived threats to ships and port facilities in the wake of the 9/11 attacks in the United States. The ISPS Code is implemented through chapter XI-2 Special measures to enhance maritime security in the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974. The Code has two parts, one mandatory and one recommendatory.
In essence, the Code takes the approach that ensuring the security of ships and port facilities is a risk management activity and that, to determine what security measures are appropriate, an assessment of the risks must be made in each particular case. The purpose of the Code is to provide a standardised, consistent framework for evaluating risk, enabling Governments to offset changes in threat with changes in vulnerability for ships and port facilities through determination of appropriate security levels and corresponding security measures.
To Read More Please Click Here.
To Get Familiar With The Its Measures Or If You Want To Enhance Your Ability In Maintaining The Proper Implementation Throughout Operational Life Of  Your Good Fleet , Please Don’t Hesitate And Request Our Training Service.

ISM Code and Guidelines on Implementation of the ISM Code 2010

International Safety Management Code

Resolution A.741(18) as amended by MSC.104(73), MSC.179(79), MSC.195(80) and MSC.273(85)
PREAMBLE
1   The purpose of this Code is to provide an international standard for the safe management and operation of ships and for pollution prevention.
2   The Assembly adopted resolution A.443(XI), by which it invited all Governments to take the necessary steps to safeguard the shipmaster in the proper discharge of his responsibilities with regard to maritime safety and the protection of the marine environment.
3   The Assembly also adopted resolution A.680(17), by which it further recognized the need for appropriate organization of management to enable it to respond to the need of those on board ships to achieve and maintain high standards of safety and environmental protection.
4   Recognizing that no two shipping companies or shipowners are the same, and that ships operate under a wide range of different conditions, the Code is based on general principles and objectives.
5   The Code is expressed in broad terms so that it can have a widespread application. Clearly, different levels of management, whether shore-based or at sea, will require varying levels of knowledge and awareness of the items outlined.
6   The cornerstone of good safety management is commitment from the top. In matters of safety and pollution prevention it is the commitment, competence, attitudes and motivation of individuals at all levels that determines the end result.
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To Get Familiar With The Its Measures Or If You Want To Enhance Your Ability In Maintaining The Proper Implementation Throughout Operational Life Of  Your Good Fleet , Please Don’t Hesitate And Request Our Training Service.

International Convention on Load Lines

Adoption: 5 April 1966; Entry into force: 21 July 1968

It has long been recognized that limitations on the draught to which a ship may be loaded make a significant contribution to her safety. These limits are given in the form of freeboards, which constitute, besides external weathertight and watertight integrity, the main objective of the Convention.
The first International Convention on Load Lines, adopted in 1930, was based on the principle of reserve buoyancy, although it was recognized then that the freeboard should also ensure adequate stability and avoid excessive stress on the ship’s hull as a result of overloading.
In the 1966 Load Lines convention, adopted by IMO, provisions are made for determining the freeboard of ships by subdivision and damage stability calculations.
The regulations take into account the potential hazards present in different zones and different seasons. The technical annex contains several additional safety measures concerning doors, freeing ports, hatchways and other items. The main purpose of these measures is to ensure the watertight integrity of ships’ hulls below the freeboard deck.
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To Get Familiar With Its Measures Or If You Want To Enhance Your Ability In Maintaining The Proper Implementation Throughout Operational Life Of  Your Good Fleet , Please Don’t Hesitate And Request Our Training Service.

International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships

Adoption: 23 June 1969; Entry into force: 18 July 1982

IT69
The Convention, adopted by IMO in 1969, was the first successful attempt to introduce a universal tonnage measurement system.
Previously, various systems were used to calculate the tonnage of merchant ships. Although all went back to the method devised by George Moorsom of the British Board of Trade in 1854, there were considerable differences between them and it was recognized that there was a great need for one single international system.
The Convention provides for gross and net tonnages, both of which are calculated independently.
The rules apply to all ships built on or after 18 July 1982 – the date of entry into force – while ships built before that date were allowed to retain their existing tonnage for 12 years after entry into force, or until 18 July 1994.
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To Get Familiar With The Its Measures Or If You Want To Enhance Your Ability In Maintaining The Proper Implementation Throughout Operational Life Of  Your Good Fleet , Please Don’t Hesitate And Request Our Training Service.

International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL)

Adoption: 1973 (Convention), 1978 (1978 Protocol), 1997 (Protocol – Annex VI); Entry into force: 2 October 1983 (Annexes I and II).

The International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) is the main international convention covering prevention of pollution of the marine environment by ships from operational or accidental causes.

The MARPOL Convention was adopted on 2 November 1973 at IMO. The Protocol of 1978 was adopted in response to a spate of tanker accidents in 1976-1977. As the 1973 MARPOL Convention had not yet entered into force, the 1978 MARPOL Protocol absorbed the parent Convention. The combined instrument entered into force on 2 October 1983. In 1997, a Protocol was adopted to amend the Convention and a new Annex VI was added which entered into force on 19 May 2005. MARPOL has been updated by amendments through the years.
The Convention includes regulations aimed at preventing and minimizing pollution from ships – both accidental pollution and that from routine operations – and currently includes six technical Annexes. Special Areas with strict controls on operational discharges are included in most Annexes.
To Get Familiar With The Its Measures Or If You Want To Enhance Your Ability In Maintaining The Proper Implementation Throughout Operational Life Of  Your Good Fleet , Please Don’t Hesitate And Request Our Training Service.

International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974

Adoption: 1 November 1974; Entry into force: 25 May 1980

The SOLAS Convention in its successive forms is generally regarded as the most important of all international treaties concerning the safety of merchant ships. The first version was adopted in 1914, in response to the Titanic disaster, the second in 1929, the third in 1948, and the fourth in 1960. The 1974 version includes the tacit acceptance procedure – which provides that an amendment shall enter into force on a specified date unless, before that date, objections to the amendment are received from an agreed number of Parties.

As a result the 1974 Convention has been updated and amended on numerous occasions. The Convention in force today is sometimes referred to as SOLAS, 1974, as amended.
Technical provisions
The main objective of the SOLAS Convention is to specify minimum standards for the construction, equipment and operation of ships, compatible with their safety. Flag States are responsible for ensuring that ships under their flag comply with its requirements, and a number of certificates are prescribed in the Convention as proof that this has been done. Control provisions also allow Contracting Governments to inspect ships of other Contracting States if there are clear grounds for believing that the ship and its equipment do not substantially comply with the requirements of the Convention – this procedure is known as port State control.The current SOLAS Convention includes Articles setting out general obligations, amendment procedure and so on, followed by an Annex divided into 12 Chapters.
To Read More Please Click Here.
To Get Familiar With The Its Measures Or If You Want To Enhance Your Ability In Maintaining The Proper Implementation Throughout Operational Life Of  Your Good Fleet , Please Don’t Hesitate And Request Our Training Service.